Loving v. Virginia

Today in Supreme Court history is a big one:


Loving v. Virginia, decided June 12, 1967, was a landmark civil rights decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that laws banning interracial marriage violate the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Beginning in 2013, it was cited as precedent in U.S. federal court decisions holding restrictions on same-sex marriage in the United States unconstitutional, including in the 2015 Supreme Court decision Obergefell v. Hodges.


Loving v. Virginia is considered one of the most significant legal decisions of the civil rights era. By declaring Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law unconstitutional, the Supreme Court ended prohibitions on interracial marriage and dealt a major blow to segregation.

Despite the court’s decision, however, some states were slow to alter their laws. The last state to officially accept the ruling was Alabama, which only removed an anti-miscegenation statute from its state constitution in 2000.


Here in NC, Article 14, Section 8 was adopted during the Constitutional Convention of 1875. The amendment, outlawing interracial marriage, remained a part of the North Carolina Constitution until 1971, when a new state constitution was adopted. In 1977 the General Assembly passed a law validating all interracial marriages that occurred prior to March 24, 1977, the date of the law’s passage.



4 views

Recent Posts

See All